Climate Change Case Studies (requires google chrome browser)

See our 360 tour case studies of locations dealing with Climate Change in Wales and Internationally.

Wales - Case Studies

W1 - Llantwit Major Beach is situated on the Southern coastline of Wales, UK lying at the end of a small valley that was once home to a larger river than the current stream.

 

The beach is part of the Glamorgan Heritage Coast and experiences dramatic erosion including cliff falls which have caused fatalities. Cliff falls can reveal Jurassic fossils, including corals, giant brachiopods, gastropods and the bones of Ichthyosaurus.

Credits: Prof. Allan Williams (University of Wales Trinity Saint David), Gwyn Nelson

W2 - Southerndown is located in South Wales, UK and is the ‘Jewel in the crown’ of Glamorgan Heritage Coast sites being very popular with tourists. Due to facing west it is exposed to the Atlantic Ocean.

Credits: Prof. Allan Williams (University of Wales Trinity Saint David), Gwyn Nelson

W3 - Newton

 

The current decision at Newton, which has a tidal range of more than 8m, is to stop maintaining the coastal defences because of climate change and a corresponding rise in sea level.

Credits: Prof. Allan Williams (University of Wales Trinity Saint David), Gwyn Nelson

W4 - Porthcawl is a tourist town on the South Wales Coastline which originally developed as a coal exporting port in the 19th century. Porthcawl built its first seawall in 1887.


Credits: Prof. Allan Williams (University of Wales Trinity Saint David), Gwyn Nelson

W5 - Newgale, Wales is small tourist town popular in the summer for water sports. The beach is 2 miles wide with rugged scenery, surfing waves and nature walks.


Credits: Emyr Williams (Pembrokeshire Council), Gwyn Nelson

W6 - Fairbourne is a welsh seaside village, surrounded by Snowdonia National park.

In Fairbourne the decision has been made, to stop maintaining sea defences (by 2054).With climate change; higher risks face the community due to sea level rise, increasing storm frequency and storm intensity.

And with the effects of climate change increasing, It will not be possible to continue to protect this community and others in Wales against climate change as it will become too expensive and unsafe.

Credits: Lisa Jane Goodier (Gwynedd Council), Gwyn Nelson

W7 - Newborough, South West Anglesey, initiated a dune stabilisation program in the 1950's, due to the harvesting of marram grass for local communities between the 1800' to 1950's.


Credits: Guy Walker-Springett (Bangor University), Gwyn Nelson